Rainbow welcome in prayerful Seoul

When travelling to Europe from Australia you cannot and should not forget we are part of Asia.

Sauntering into steamy Seoul this afternoon we were greeted with a welcoming rainbow as if to assure us we are in the right place. Overnight at least.
Having checked in to our aptly named Sky Hotel near Incheon Airport, I ducked outside to join many locals in admiring and photographing the colours in the sky.

South Korea is one of the most prayerful nations on the planet with millions of devout Christians well-known for their all night prayer vigils and prayer mountains.

Not surprisingly I found a church steeple to partner with the rainbow, which by this stage had lost some of its initial brightness.

Walking back to our hotel a young Korean woman walked past wearing an over-sized t-shirt that said, ‘In God we Trust’. I read it out loud and smiled and received one in return.

Prayer seems all the more important for South Korea when seeing close at hand its proximity to large neighbours China and Russia and of course it’s cranky northern relative. Pray for the peace of Korea…

 

Holy relics travel the world and come home to see out their days

I bought them from a department store for a few dollars four years ago, not the coolest or the most expensive but they did the job.

They’ve flipped through the sand playfully and rested on tiles prayerfully with Bali’s beautiful peopleThey made an accidental appearance at Wimbledon, and may have suffered a dollop of warm cream from my strawberries.

A European summer was a fitting environment for these fine friends and not to be outdown by more practical measures

They tasted the dust of Rome’s ancient paths

Cooled in the light blue waters of Venician canalsStood beneath David’s marble features in Florence, dashing through the piazzas.

Not to be outdown by time and distance, they found their place in India’s complex culturesShopping for sarees on Commercial St, BangaloreA dash of tea near a St Thomas church on a steamy afternoon

The sands of Chennai clinging and the blood of the martyr as close as could be

And then there are the wonders of our broad landCarried along the in the far north during a Cape Tribulation stroll

The sounds of Italy and the smell of garlic down Leichhardt streets

windmill on a Brisbane hill looked down on my friends

The trams of Melbourne could not shake us apart

And many other places

But in the end, after taking eveything I could throw at them

Or even when I threw them at anything, many times

They have been undone by nothing more

Than the little cuts and grinds of wear and tear

And though my trust remains strong

My fellow travellers are approaching their last journey

And will abide as holy relics